Tag Archives: Agrimony

Agrimoni – Agrimonia Pilos Ledeb

Agrimoni – Agrimonia Pilos Ledeb

Agrimony (Agrimonia) is a genus of 12-15 species of perennial herbaceous flowering plants in the family Rosaceae, native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with one species also in Africa. The species grow to between 0.5-2 m tall, with interrupted pinnate leaves, and tiny yellow flowers borne on a single (usually unbranched) spike.

Agrimonia species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Grizzled Skipper (recorded on A. eupatoria) and Large Grizzled Skipper.

Species
  • Agrimonia eupatoria – Common Agrimony (Europe, Asia, Africa)
  • Agrimonia gryposepala – Tall Hairy Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia incisa – Incised Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia coreana – Korean Agrimony (eastern Asia)
  • Agrimonia microcarpa – Smallfruit Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia nipponica – Japanese Agrimony (eastern Asia)
  • Agrimonia parviflora – Harvestlice Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia pilosa – Hairy Agrimony (eastern Europe, Asia)
  • Agrimonia procera – Fragrant Agrimony (Europe)
  • Agrimonia pubescens – Soft Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia repens – Short Agrimony (southwest Asia)
  • Agrimonia rostellata – Beaked Agrimony (North America)
  • Agrimonia striata – Roadside Agrimony (North America)

Medicinal value

Agrimony has a long history of medicinal use. The English poet Michael Drayton once hailed it as an “all-heal,” and through the ages it did seem to be a Panacea. The ancient Greeks used Agrimony to treat eye ailments, and it was made into brews to cure diarrhea and disorders of the gallbladder, liver, and kidneys. Anglo-Saxons made a solution from the leaves and seeds for healing wounds; this use continued through the Middle Ages and afterward, in a preparation called eau d’arquebusade , or “musket-shot water.”Later, agrimony was prescribed for athlete’s foot. In the United States and Canada, and late into the 19th century,the plant was prescribed for many of these illnesses and more: for skin diseases, asthma, coughs, and gynecological complaints, and as a gargling solution for sore throats.

Flolklore

Although the plant has no narcotic properties, tradition holds that when placed under a person’s head, Agrimony will induce a deep sleep that will last until removed.

Agrimony, Agrimonia, genus, species, perennial herbaceous, flowering plants, family Rosaceae, native, temperate regions, Northern Hemisphere, species, Africa, The species,  interrupted, pinnate leaves, tiny yellow flowers, borne  spike, flower, herb, leaf